Dad-and-babyWhat is Conscious Parenting?

Conscious parenting is a lifelong commitment, a commitment not just to parenting and children but to personal transformation. It begins with us as adults: parents, teachers, mothers, fathers, sons and daughters; with all of our insecurities, fears and imperfections. It is a commitment to see deeply into ourselves, and from that place of self-honesty, bring wisdom, compassion and acceptance to our children and our world. In a time of overwhelming stress and violence, our task must be to create sanctuary for the innate, organic innocence of our children to grow and flourish.

fourkidsThus conscious parenting is more than home-birthing, breastfeeding, eating healthy food, seeking alternative education, and many other decisions we will have to make as parents, although it may include any or all of these elements. It is a willingness to live as examples of the life we want for them, and through our very being to communicate our love for them, for the sacred, and for the highest possibility of life.

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This website is an effort to bring together many different sources of help on the path of conscious parenting, from the teachings and writings of Lee Lozowick, Jean Liedloff, Joseph Chilton Pierce and other leaders in the field, to the ongoing struggles and inspirations of all of us “ordinary” parents shared via articles, blog posts, interviews and books. Events and workshops that support these efforts will also be featured here, as will any other resources we find valuable. We invite and welcome your feedback, questions and inspirations.

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Latest Blog Articles & Posts

What Do Toys Have to Do With Inner Validation?
Toys, Technology and Creativity
When practising self-observation, I notice that I frequently look outside of myself for validation. This is not a happy or healthy habit. It is a habit I don't want my children to have so I wonder how it happened and how can I avoid passing it on.  Is it because when a child has a need or painful feelings and the adult can not meet that need or doesn't know how to explain that life is, in part, painful, they try to make the child feel better by distracting them with toys or food? Does this teach children to look outside of themselves for comfort? Is this the basis of our rampant consumer society? In my wish to get clarity about the issue, I asked the Conscious Parenting team a vague, un-clear question about whether toys contributed to looking outside of ourselves for validation. I got a variety of responses that did not necessarily address what I was trying to ask. My fault. But the responses came with a lot of value, nevertheless, and deserved to be shared. This first piece come...
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Home Schooling
Education
Home schooling is a big commitment. Considerations are many. Once you make the decision to forego sending your child to a classroom, another set of considerations pop up. Not only do home schooling parents need to navigate mandatory education requirements, they live with cultural and individual opinions about their choice to steer the way their child learns. One home schooling mother of a young child sent us this email and shared a link to an article she found useful. We share them both with you in hopes that you will find them useful. “I’m going to make a big pile of lego parts, and I’m going to just experiment with them and see what I come up with,” says my child from the other room as I sort through emails at my desk and come across this article about homeschooling. The mood of relaxed enjoyment of the “experimental process,” resonates with the tone of the article. As for whether my child fulfills the “standard” of his age group, I do not know, and I sometimes feel insecure. But w...
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Technology and the Young Child's Brain Part III
Toys, Technology and Creativity
As a final, for now, posting on this topic, a quote from Lee Lozowick.             "One of the saddest aspects of technology today is that children, even infants, are exposed to so much television, so many video games, and so many movies at such a young age. Among other experts and child advocates, Joseph Chilton Pearce, author of Magical Child (Plume, 1992) and Evolution's End (HarperOne 1993), says that even an ostensibly loving parental situation could be highly compromised for a child by television that is present from infancy. The imaginal faculties aren't present when a baby is born. They develop later - at three, four, five, maybe six years. Pearce says that if one sits children in front of a television, it's like feeding predigested food to their minds. They're getting images that they don't have to learn to create on their own, and so the imaginal faculties don't develop, and this is crippling to them. As they grow, these...
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Technology and the Young Child's Brain - Part II
Toys, Technology and Creativity
A group of parent I know were discussing children and technology use when one woman pointed out that people " think that if their kid doesn’t use devices they may be missing out on something." This prompted another parent to comment that perhaps we need a different approach entirely as " that argument fails to question sufficiently the merits of having one's child right up to speed with all the other racers."  This statement gave me chills. It made me realize that not only are early-introduced-to-technology children not able to develop their own internal images; all of us using electronic screens are receiving the exact same images! What will this do to creativity and individuality in the long term? In the early 1960s Malvina Reynolds wrote the song 'Little Boxes', sung by Pete Seeger. It became an instant hit. Have you heard it? The song is a satire on the development of suburbia and the conformist middle class. The beginning lyrics go: "Little boxes on the hillside, Little bo...
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Technology and the Young Child's Brain
Toys, Technology and Creativity
Part One In our society, children begin, at a very young age, to use electronic devices. This a matter worth researching, thinking about and discussing.  A few months ago I came across a pair of media articles arguing the pros and cons children using handheld devices and decided to do some research. The findings of Joseph Chilton Pearce, child development expert and author, were the most useful. This is my understanding of what I read. Our culture began to change significantly with the introduction of television. As the world rushed forward, parents began to rely on this passive entertainment to keep their children amused while they attended to the daily demands on their time. At first, no one thought about the effects of moving from an audio story telling culture to a form of storytelling that provided its own images, negating the need for people to form the pictures in their minds. Television evolved into computers and ever more sophisticated technology. The danger that exist...
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